Building a WordPress “product box” plugin, part 2 – shortcodes and frontend

Part 1 – Initial idea, design, and first-pass implementation
Part 2 – Building the product box that gets displayed in posts
Part 3 – Refactoring the codebase into classes, views, and separate files
Part 4 – Adding image uploading, shared plugin options, and uninstallation

Now it’s time to render the Product Box in a post and give it some attractive styling.

Day 6: Embedding the Product Box in a post using a Shortcode

With the management page built (or at least built enough), the next thing I wanted to do was see a product box in a post. I knew I wanted to do this with a WordPress shortcode, so I started by reading the Shortcode API and a Shortcode tutorial and used it to whip up the most basic Shortcode-driven bit of code in the history of WP plugins:

function amazin_product_box_shortcode( $atts ) {
    $a = shortcode_atts( array(
        'id' => 'id'
        ), $atts );
    return "Hello from Amazin Product Box for post ID " . $a['id'] . '!';
}
add_shortcode( 'amazin-product-box', 'amazin_product_box_shortcode' );

I have the new Gutenberg (blocks) version of WP so I used the “Shortcode” block to put my plugin’s Shortcode into the post:

And here it is in the published post! (It’s the last line, the one that begins with “Hello”.)

Sweet – it’s in the post!

The next step was to make it HTML, not just a string. I encountered a few problems along the way, so I documented them and their fixes here to help explain the code a bit better.

I now have a product box in a post displaying real data from the database.

The code for this step can be found here.

Tying up a few loose ends: classes on the HTML tags, Shortcodes in the management table

In preparation for styling the box, I added classes to all the HTML elements. The plugin will have some default styles, but will also expose the CSS for the user to edit to their liking (and save it somewhere).

Here are the classes in their own commit (yeah, it’s a tiny commit :) )

I also went back to the admin page and made it so Shortcodes display here without rendering as product boxes inside the table. That commit is here.

Day 7: Styling the Product Box

The next thing I did was add a stylesheet to the project, enqueue it, and add a bunch of styles to make the default Product Box look better. Here it is in my post, now styled:

Here is the commit that adds the box’s styling.

I also added the “We Recommend” text at the top, which is hard-coded for now but will ultimately be something the user can edit in the plugin’s settings (so that the user only has to change it in one place if they want it to say something different, like “Our Pick”, or hide it entirely) and fixed a problem with loading the posts for editing (it was the same “NULL fix” I used for displaying them in the post).

I considered letting the user modify the Amazin’ Product Box’s CSS via the plugin, but realized that 1. this would be a ton of work to develop, debug, and support, likely involving sanitizing the user’s CSS input and saving it to a file in the plugin directory, retrieving it, using it (or parts of it) based on the user’s settings and 2. this functionality is basically already present in WordPress’s own Appearance > Customize tab.

As a test, I restyled the button using WP’s custom CSS area. Anyone who wants to change the look of an Amazin’ Product Box should be able to safely do so via their theme or child theme or WP’s Customize using this same technique.

The photo area is just a placeholder for now, I’ll come back to that in a bit. For now, move on to Part 3 where I refactor everything I’ve built so far to be more “standardized”.