OSU eCampus CS492 Mobile Development review and recap

This post is part of an ongoing series recapping my experience in Oregon State University’s eCampus (online) post-baccalaureate Computer Science degree program. You can learn more about the program here.

Six-word summary: BEST COURSE IN THE PROGRAM 🥇

This class rules. Yong Bakos is a fantastic lecturer and course designer. CS 492 is the missing link between all the small-scope student projects you’ve done so far and the much larger, much more complex projects you’ll work on as a professional.

They call it “mobile development” because you’ll do this class’s work in Dart and Flutter, and see your work on a mobile device, but this class grows a ton of skills that are important no matter what you end up working on.

My advice: take this class even if you have no interest in mobile development.

CS492 Review

CS492 is what every class in this program should’ve been.

Every week introduces a batch of lectures that are actually enjoyable and useful. Follow along with the examples and what you build is directly useful for the projects you turn in every 2 weeks.

This class covers a huge range of topics, including:

  • Setting up a development and build environment above and beyond just running a file from the command line
  • Coding style, with concrete examples of what to do and what not to do
  • Working with an SDK
  • Reading and using API docs
  • Refactoring, “code smells”, best practices for structuring methods and projects as a whole
  • Design patterns that you can take to any language
  • Best practices (guards, import order, function design)
  • Actually building something!

I took CS492 the first time it was offered so I have to admit, I was pretty scared. Some OSU classes have taught me to temper my expectations and I was bracing for an uneven workload, messy, unfinished course content, unclear expectations, long-winded 50 minute lectures full of “ums” and mistakes that go uncaught, etc.

I mean, even the courses that have been running for longer than I’ve been a student suffer from all of these problems and they’ve had ample time to clean up, so why wouldn’t a brand new one be more of the same?

None of these things were a problem in CS492.

This class was organized, consistent, and predictable. The lectures are high-res, easy to follow, and enjoyable. You follow along with the professor as he builds a project from scratch. Each lecture is just 4-8 minutes long and covers a specific topic, so you don’t waste time scrubbing through a marathon hour-long lecture for the part you need. Early lectures are followed by a coding exercise built right into Canvas where you can complete a quick ungraded exercise to reinforce what you just learned.

The project grading rubrics were clear. The weekly discussions felt meaningful (for the most part), and I found myself skimming what other people contributed just to see what I could learn from them.

The projects felt like the start of something “real”, and I enjoyed the opportunity to use all the pieces of the framework. Overall, I learned a ton in this class and it was almost entirely smooth sailing.

The only things I didn’t like were:

  1. Initially, new modules unlocked on Mondays instead of Sundays (like almost all the courses do), making it hard to get a running start during the weekend. Many students complained and the instructor running the course (not the same person who recorded the lectures) started unlocking them Friday at midnight. This kind of responsiveness is fantastic. The early-unlocks ended around week 7, when I think the instructor was still editing the pre-recorded lectures. If they improve one thing in this class, I hope they make the next week’s content unlock earlier than Monday.
  2. Initially, the correct answers to the weekly quizzes remained hidden forever. During Week 3, the instructor changed a Canvas setting to release the quiz answers a day after the quizzes were due. Quizzes that just tell you what you got without telling you the right answers so you can learn from them are useless, so I’m glad the instructor listened to reason on this one, too.

I liked that the instructor (who was different from the guy who recorded the lectures) was responsive to student complaints about these things.

I also liked how this class hit the ground running. In the first week you get set up with Flutter and follow a well put-together tutorial that guides you through making a simple app. Wow, a simple app in the first week! The following weeks continue to add complexity, and the end result is a course with a very satisfying “deep dive” feel to it.

CS492 course structure

  • 10 weeks
  • There’s a book but I didn’t get it and managed an A without it
  • Weekly quizzes (took me about an hour apiece, they’re not trivial and there is some wording I would have changed here or there, but they aren’t horrible)
  • Class-wide Canvas-based discussion to post to by Wednesday of each week (the topic changes each week)
  • Response to someone else’s discussion post due by Sunday of each week (the response was usually fairly detailed, ie: write a rebuttal, provide sources, implement a some code to create what the OP was describing, etc.)
  • New material unlocks every Monday – later changed to early Saturday morning, later back to Monday much to everyone’s chagrin in the final weeks
  • 4 projects (the 3rd one was the hardest/most time-consuming, but they were all a fair bit of work)
  • Project submissions are both your code and a 90-120 second video (screen recording) of your project as you quickly step through it to demonstrate it meets the requirements
  • Proctored final exam worth 35% of the grade – note: in my run of the class, the final was changed to unproctored near the end of the quarter due to a lack of testing sites because of COVID-19

I cannot say enough good things about the quality of teaching in CS492.

Take this class. Take this class. Take this class.

Topics covered

  • Many Flutter-specific conventions like Widgets that, while they may seem specific to Flutter, have analogs to other libraries like React
  • Structuring and modularizing a project
  • Asynchronous programming (async/await)
  • Saving data to on-device storage
  • Saving user preferences
  • Hooking up to an external database with Firebase
  • Uploading and retrieving photos to/from cloud storage with Firebase
  • Integration testing in Flutter (lightly covered)
  • Debugging

Time commitment

I took CS492 alone, which gave me time to really dig into everything. I might’ve spent a little less time on it had I paired it with a second class, but every week was very consistent and worked out to about:

  • 3-4 hours watching the lectures, reading the accompanying explanations, and following along with the code (the lectures themselves are maybe 45-70 minutes of content each week but I paused a lot to follow along)
  • 2 hours on the weekly quiz
  • 1-2 hours on my weekly discussion post
  • 1-2 hours on my weekly discussion post reply
  • About 8-10 hours on the current project

That’s about 15-20 hours a week depending on the week. The weeks where projects were due tended to be closer to the “20” end of that spectrum than weeks where projects were introduced. This was mostly because the second week of each project tended to contain the lectures pertaining to the more challenging aspects of the project.

The projects spanned 2 weeks, but lectures unlock weekly, so you could only get through half the project the first week because the second half of lectures wouldn’t unlock until the next week.

For example:

  • Week A – Project assigned, needs Lectures from Week A and Week B to complete, only Lectures A are made available
  • Week B – Lectures B become available, project due at the end of the week

This got irritating at times. At the end of every “Week A” it felt like sitting in a holding pattern all weekend waiting for the second batch of lectures to unlock so I could start the second half of the project, but I always had enough to for the first part of the project and could fill the weekend.

My advice to other students in this holding pattern is to do absolutely everything you can do for the first half of the project in the first week. Leave nothing that could be done in “Week A” for “Week B”, and you’ll be fine.

Recording projects

This was my first class that asked for screen recordings and I was pretty intimidated at first. I do not like being recorded and tend to make a lot of mistakes, get really self-conscious, freeze up, etc. However, much to my relief, you don’t have to record yourself or any kind of voice-over, just your screen.

You just step through the script they provide you and after a few run-throughs you’ll nail it all in one take. I found it helpful to create a doc with an extremely detailed, click by click script to follow and have someone else read it to me. That way I didn’t have to switch between the script and my active recording, and didn’t lose my place so much.

On a Mac, it’s easy to make a screen recording using Quicktime. Just search for Quicktime Player, cancel the default dialog it opens, then right click it to start a new screen recording.

My recordings were usually around 80MB but Canvas accepted them just fine.

CS492’s lectures are fantastic

In general, the lectures in this online CS program are low quality. Many classes have lectures that are poorly paced, unedited, boring, or only loosely related to the assignment you’ll be doing that week.

CS492’s lectures are none of that. They are short, punchy, and purposeful. They’re organized by topic and easy to find later when you need to refer back to one.

You follow along with the lecturer as he codes from scratch, explaining every decision he makes. He gives tons of little tips, too (like “build frequently”, “don’t make a temp variable just to return it in the next line”, etc.) and he explains his reasoning as he splits things into methods.

It’s like getting to pair program with the most senior dev on your team. This screencap is from week 2 and while a lot of what he covered was review for me, I didn’t feel like he was wasting my time. I genuinely enjoyed following along with him.

Yes, I could use a second monitor.

Nothing in this class felt irrelevant. The work felt like real work (like the kind of work you’ll do at a job once you graduate from OSU). Week 2 was the only week that felt like a bit of a rehash (it covers starting a project, wiring up inputs, organizing things into functions, etc.) but it was a good review and it didn’t take up too much time.

(This process of breaking a program down into pieces, setting up the prints, the inputs, breaking it into modules, and reasoning through the project’s could be moved to CS162 where everyone will see it and learn from it early on.)

Whoa, Canvas has a repl?

I hope Canvas’s support for repl.it is a new feature, otherwise I’m going to be seriously salty that every previous class in this program missed this incredible teaching opportunity.

The repl exercises in CS492 aren’t graded, but they’re broken down into little bite-size pieces that take a few minutes to complete and do a great job of reinforcing the current topic.

Honestly, some of these exercises feel like entry level interview questions. I was grateful for the practice.

Even better (I didn’t discover this until Week 3), you can hook up repl.it to your GitHub account and your edits to the repls will be saved.

They’re public, which isn’t how I usually like to store my student work, but keeping organized backups of my work on these exercises was a big help.

Tips for CS492

Set up the Dart SDK and Flutter ahead of time, or at least early. The setup isn’t necessarily straightforward. In my case, it took about 2-3 hours to work through all the missing components of the install (I needed to upgrade RVM, Ruby, install Cocoapods in the right place, read half a dozen Stack Overflows from people with similar problems, etc.) Some people had a harder time than I did. Starting early is a good idea. You’re good to go when running flutter doctor gives you a clean output of checkmarks.

Get a second monitor (or use a second computer) to display the lectures on their own screen. I made it this far in this CS program before I felt like I needed a second monitor. If you can get two screens, do it – the lectures are much more enjoyable if you aren’t flipping between tabs/programs every few seconds.

Week 3 is also when I got clever and started watching the lectures on my PC and following along on my laptop. Not having to flip back and forth between Chrome and Visual Studio Code saved me a lot of time.

Quiz tips: Unlike some classes, the multiple choice options in this class’s quizzes are not obvious joke answers. Here, the wrong answers are often correct in some way, but don’t answer the question that was asked. Pick the answer that is both correct and most accurately answers the question. It’s sometimes subtle and difficult to spot at a glance. This same advice applies to the final.

Mac/MacBook tip: I worked in Android Studio because I liked it best of the options, but I found the Android emulator to run extremely slowly (like 2 frames a second) while the iOS Simulator ran like butter. You can invoke the iOS Simulator from Android Studio, so don’t let the “Android” label scare you off if you’re on a Mac.

Final exam tips: None of the questions were repeats from the quizzes, but reviewing all the quizzes and the writings that accompanied each lecture was time well-spent in preparation.

Due to COVID-19 shutting down so many test sites at the end of the Winter quarter, the final exam was changed to be unproctored. Future versions of this class might go back to a proctored final, but in my humble opinion, they should leave it unproctored.

The exam was still challenging, but since it was open book it felt like one last opportunity to learn something instead of a punitive experience. The questions aren’t readily Googleable and still require in-depth familiarity with the course’s material. I don’t think having access to the course’s material during the exam raised my final exam grade by more than a point or two, and the timed-but-open-book exam (which was still worth 35% of the final grade) felt more in line with the spirit of the class.

If you do face a proctored version of this final, you can take some comfort in knowing that if you paid attention all quarter long, you’ll do fine. Nothing on the exam was a surprise, and there wasn’t anything painful about it (no tracking memory registers by hand, no memorizing formulas and algorithms, no writing code into a blank Canvas form).

Take this class. Even if you have no interest in being a mobile developer, you’ll benefit from working in a more complex, real-world SDK than what previous classes exposed you to. This class also covers a ton of general-purpose topics that will refine your skills and be useful no matter what you do in your CS career.

If this class is indicative of the quality we can expect at OSU periodically revamps this program’s classes, then I’m very optimistic about the quality of OSU’s online CS program in the coming years. CS492 felt like getting to pair program with a senior engineer for a few hours a week, every single week. Thanks for the great class, Professor Bakos.

CS492 is the highest quality course in the OSU program. It does not run every quarter (I took it in Winter 2020) but it is worth waiting (or retooling your schedule) for.

And that’s it! The only class I have left is Capstone next quarter.

PS: Seriously, take this class.

One thought on “OSU eCampus CS492 Mobile Development review and recap”

  1. I’m taking mobile next term. I was already excited about it and reading this makes me even more so. Thanks for everything you put up here.

    I look forward to seeing what you have to say about capstone because that’s in two terms and currently I have no idea what it even is. lol.

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